Happy 200th, General Lee

Robert E. Lee

Robert E. Lee

Happy Robert E. Lee Day! Today is the 200th birthday of one of the finest men ever to walk American soil. Today we honor him and praise the Lord for the example we have in men such as he was.

Most well-known for his role as general of the army of Northern Virginia during the War of Northern Aggression, Lee also served in the Mexican-American war and in various capacities at West Point and Washington College (later Washington and Lee College). Lee was a faithful Christian soldier and unlike many of his northern counterparts, acted nobly and principally in his leadership role as general. Compare him, for example, to the likes of William T. Sherman or Ulysses S. Grant of whom 19th century English historian/author G.A. Henty writes:

[Grant’s warfare tactic]… was a terrible programme and involved an expenditure of life far beyond anything that had taken place. Grant’s plan, in fact, was to fight and to keep on fighting, regardless of his own losses, until at last the Confederate army, whose losses could not be replaced, melted away. It was a strategy that few generals have dared to practise, and fewer still to acknowledge. — from With Lee in Virginia, G.A. Henty

stars-and-barsAlthough the war was lost, the integrity of his character and the memory of his Christian nobility will never be forgotten. He acted with courage and did not act pragmatically when facing seemingly impossible odds. His unflinching trust in the sovereignty of God can be a lesson to each of us. To end the post… not only my favourite quote by Lee, but one of my very favourites by anyone:

The truth is this: The march of Providence is so slow and our desires so impatient; the work of progress is so immense and our means of aiding it so feeble; the life of humanity is so long, that of the individual so brief, that we often see only the ebb of the advancing wave and are thus discouraged. It is history that teaches us to hope. —Robert E. Lee

By |2017-02-22T16:44:14+00:00January 19th, 2007|History, Quotes|

Texas on Ice, Part II

For the second day in a row, we were not able to go anywhere (including work), as the ice has moved in and seemingly taken over. For another full day and night, the temperature has not exceeded the low thirties and there is nothing for miles that is not completely encased in ice. The problem is this: it is just slightly too warm for it to snow, so the precipitation comes down like semi-frozen mush and then freezes within a few moments, thoroughly coating everything with ice. Even the horses’ manes have icicles dangling from them!

Very selective ice, clinging only to the needles

Very selective ice, clinging only to the needles

The icy forest of Pipe Creek

The icy forest of Pipe Creek

Mary enjoys the unusual weather

Mary enjoys the unusual weather

Making Beauty's life more comfortable with a blanket

Making Beauty’s life more comfortable with a blanket

Half an inch of ice collects on these leaves

Half an inch of ice collects on these leaves

<i>Everything</i> has a casing of ice

Everything has a casing of ice

Every individual blade of grass trapped in ice

Every individual blade of grass trapped in ice

The ice is ten times the height of the object upon which it forms

The ice is ten times the height of the object upon which it forms

Sam and Mary in front of an icy canopy of tree tops

Sam and Mary in front of an icy canopy of tree tops

Even Dixie braved the icy outdoors

Even Dixie braved the icy outdoors

The biggest icicles of them all...

The biggest icicles of them all…

...were found on the back porch of our aunt's house

…were found on the back porch of our aunt’s house

By |2017-02-22T16:44:15+00:00January 17th, 2007|Family|

Texas on Ice, Part I

For nearly forty-eight hours now, the temperature has not exceeded 32° here in Pipe Creek. We woke up this morning to a very wintery looking South Texas landscape. It has been raining and sleeting off and on for over a day and everything around is frozen. On my car, there is more than a full centimeter of ice covering the entire body. I can’t even open the doors! Brrrr!! Below are some shots from this morning of our winter wonder land.

Icicles on the front porch rail

Icicles on the front porch rail

Icicles on my car

Icicles on my car

More icicles on my car

More icicles on my car

There's somethin' wrong with this picture

There’s somethin’ wrong with this picture

Apparently with barbed wire, ice hangs up, not down

Apparently with barbed wire, ice hangs up, not down

Now see if you can get out, you evil pollen!

Now see if you can get out, you evil pollen!

What doesn't have icicles on it?

What doesn’t have icicles on it?

Ice hangs from the barn roof

Ice hangs from the barn roof

By |2017-02-22T16:44:15+00:00January 16th, 2007|Family|

Tales from the Reformation

As a family, we have been studying the reformation recently. Along with a series of messages by Dr. Joe Morecraft on the Reformation, we have also studied in more detail the London Baptist Confession of 1689, the Westminster Confession of 1646, and various key reformers. As none of these people or events forms in a vacuum, we have also backed up in history to look at people like the Waldenses, John Wycliffe and others. Tonight’s study brought us to look at the French Huguenots in more detail. We read of their spiritual strength and their steadfast faith in the face of fierce Catholic persecution. We came across the story of the St. Bartholomew’s Day Massacre in Sketches from Church History and were extremely moved by what we read there. What we read reminded me how instrumental trials can be in forging men of sterling character, and it makes me despise the softness and complacency that are the trademarks of our modern society. Below is a brief account from the book of the unbelievable persecution of the Huguenots at the hands of the Catholics:

From the year 1560, the French protestants were known as Huguenots. The chief Huguenot leaders were Louis de Bourbon, Prince of Conde, and Gaspard de Coligny, Admiral of France. On the Catholic side, members of the Guise family who were related to the king were the chief leaders, particularly, Francis de Guise, and Charles, a Cardinal of the Roman church.

The death of Henry II brought his son to the throne as Francis II, a youth of 16 who had married Mary Queen of Scots. Before long, however, he died of a disease of the ear and was replaced by his brother, Charles IX, a boy of ten. Catherine de Medici, his mother, then became Regent of France. At the time of her husband Henry the II’s death, she had been left with a family of five children, and was determined to protect their interest against the Guises on the one hand, and the Bourbons on the other. The Bourbons had married into the important house of Navarre, a kingdom on the frontier with Spain, and were represented by their Prince Henry, a friend of Coligny and a Huguenot, though not a man of deep religious convictions.

Shortly after 1560 a period of religious wars, which lasted on and off for thirty years, set in for France. Into the details of these wars, we cannot here enter, but we concentrate attention on the lights and shadows of the period. At the center of action was Catherine de Medici, and although at the beginning she seemed to wish to maintain balance of power between Protestant and Catholic forces, it soon became clear that her ultimate aim was to crush the Huguenots.

Craftily she hit upon a plan to gain her object. To cement a treaty between the two parties, she proposed that the Catholic princess Margaret, the sister of King Charles IX, should be given in marriage to Henry de Bourbon, the new Huguenot King of Navarre. All the notables of the land were invited to Paris where the marriage was to take place. Among them was Admiral Coligny. The Huguenots were not aware of the trap that was being set for them. Before the festivities that followed the wedding were over, there occurred one of the most hideous crimes recording in history. The date was Saint Bartholomew’s Day, 24 August, 1572. On the evening of that day Catherine went to her son, the king, and told him that the Huguenots had formed a plot to assassinate the royal family and the leaders of the Catholic party, and that to prevent the utter ruin of the house and cause, it was absolutely necessary to slay all Protestants within the city walls. Catherine had prepared a document to this effect and she presented it to the king for signature, in order to make it an official document. The weak-minded king at first refused to contemplate such a dreadful crime against a section of his subjects, but finally pressed by his mother, he yielded and exclaimed, “I consent, but, then, not one of the Huguenots must remain alive in France to reproach me with the deed; and what you do, do quickly”.

The Paris mob was to be given a free hand; only Henry of Navarre, the bridegroom on the occasion, was to be spared. At midnight, August 24, the castle bell tolled; this was the signal for the horrible butchery to begin.

It later became known as the St. Bartholomew’s Day Massacre of 24 August — 17 September 1572, Catholics killed thousands of Huguenots in Paris. Similar massacres took place in other towns in the weeks following, with a total death toll estimated as high as 110,000. An amnesty granted in 1573 pardoned the perpetrators.

By |2017-02-22T16:44:15+00:00January 14th, 2007|History, Quotes|

Samuel Adams on Morality & Freedom

As Governor of Massachusetts, Samuel Adams wrote to James Warren, February 12, 1779:

A general dissolution of the principles and manners will more surely overthrow the liberties of America than the whole force of the common enemy. While the people are virtuous they cannot be subdued; but once they lose their virtue, they will be ready to surrender their liberties to the first external or internal invader… If we would enjoy this gift of Heaven, let us become a virtuous people.

Amen Mr. Adams. To that I would add:

Except the LORD build the house, they labour in vain that build it: except the LORD keep the city, the watchman waketh but in vain. It is vain for you to rise up early, to sit up late, to eat the bread of sorrows: for so He giveth His beloved sleep. — from Psalm 127

And also:

And it shall come to pass, if thou shalt hearken diligently unto the voice of the LORD thy God, to observe and to do all His commandments which I command thee this day, that the LORD thy God will set thee on high above all nations of the earth: And all these blessings shall come on thee, and overtake thee, if thou shalt hearken unto the voice of the LORD thy God. Blessed shalt thou be in the city, and blessed shalt thou be in the field. Blessed shall be the fruit of thy body, and the fruit of thy ground, and the fruit of thy cattle, the increase of thy kine, and the flocks of thy sheep. Blessed shall be thy basket and thy store. Blessed shalt thou be when thou comest in, and blessed shalt thou be when thou goest out. The LORD shall cause thine enemies that rise up against thee to be smitten before thy face: they shall come out against thee one way, and flee before thee seven ways. — from Deuteronomy 28

By |2016-08-24T20:03:01+00:00January 4th, 2007|History, Politics, Quotes|
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